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Hawaii to Require Travelers Have Covid Booster Shot in Order to be Considered “Fully Vaccinated”

Justin Malonson

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Hawaii will require travelers to be fully vaccinated *and boosted* in order to skip the mandatory quarantine.

Travelers who do not have the Covid booster will be ordered to quarantine for five days, Hawaii Governor Ige announced.

“We know that the community needs time to react to that, so we would have to provide at least two weeks for those who may not be up-to-date to go to have the opportunity to go and get vaccinated if they need to,” the governor said, according to Hawaii News Now.

Governor Ige also said he has been speaking with mayors about requiring proof of Covid booster shots in order to dine indoors.

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ABC News reported:

Hawaii will require visitors to the state to have received a COVID-19 vaccine booster if they want to skip quarantine.

Currently, under the rules of the state’s “Safe Travels” program, travelers who don’t want to quarantine for five days must either be fully vaccinated — meaning two doses of the Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna vaccine or one shot of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine — or have a negative COVID-19 test within one day of travel.

However, the program is changing the definition of “fully vaccinated” to include booster shots, Gov. David Ige announced at a news conference last week.

This means fully vaccinated travelers who haven’t received a booster shot will have to quarantine in Hawaii for five days.

Ige said changes to the program will not occur for at least two weeks so people traveling to Hawaii can adjust their plans accordingly.

Justin Malonson is an American internet entrepreneur, Author, digital-marketing expert, founder of social-networking service Lyfeloop and CEO of international web-development agency Coastal Media Brand.

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