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FBI Warns That Making or Buying Fake COVID-19 Vaccine Record Cards Is Illegal

Brittany Jordan

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The FBI released an announcement recently warning that the production or possession of fake COVID-19 vaccine record cards is illegal.

“The Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Inspector General (HHS-OIG) and the FBI are advising the public to be aware of individuals selling fake COVID-19 vaccination record cards and encouraging others to print fake cards at home. Fake vaccination record cards have been advertised on social media websites, as well as e-commerce platforms and blogs,” reads the notice.

The FBI is also saying that one should not fill in blank vaccination cards with false data, asserting it would put people in danger of contracting the CCP (Chinese Communist Party) virus, which causes COVID-19.

“If you did not receive the vaccine, do not buy fake vaccine cards, do not make your own vaccine cards, and do not fill-in blank vaccination record cards with false information. By misrepresenting yourself as vaccinated when entering schools, mass transit, workplaces, gyms, or places of worship, you put yourself and others around you at risk of contracting COVID-19.”

Using an official government agency’s seal would be a crime, the announcement warns, and could be punishable under Title 18 United States Code, Section 1017, as well as other pertinent laws.

The notice then advises the public not to post their vaccine cards on social media websites so that they are not stolen or used to commit fraud.

On March 29, one day before the FBI notice came out, Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis said in a press conference that he will take emergency executive action shortly against the concept of Americans needing a vaccine passport to be able to travel domestically and internationally.

“We’re not supportive of that. I think it’s something that people have certain freedoms and individual liberties to make decisions for themselves,” the governor said.

Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis speaks during a press conference about the opening of a COVID-19 vaccination site at the Hard Rock Stadium in Miami Gardens, Fla., on Jan. 6, 2021. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

“It’s completely unacceptable for either the government or the private sector to impose upon you the requirement that you show proof of vaccine to just simply be able to participate in normal society.”

DeSantis said that people shouldn’t need to show proof of inoculation against the CCP virus to go to a game, movie, theme parks, or other social events.

“You want the fox to guard the henhouse? I mean give me a break,” he said. “I understand, kind of, how some folks can embrace the idea, and I’m not saying it’s all necessarily done for bad purposes, but I think ultimately it would create problems in the state.”



Brittany Jordan is an award-winning journalist who reports on breaking news in the U.S. and globally for the Federal Inquirer. Prior to her position at the Federal Inquirer, she was a general assignment features reporter for Newsweek, where she wrote about technology, politics, government news and important global events around the world. Her work has also appeared in the Washington Post, the South Florida Sun-Sentinel, Toronto Star, Frederick News-Post, West Hawaii Today, the Miami Herald, and more. Brittany enjoys food, travel, photography, and hoarding notebooks and journals. Her goal is to do more longform features journalism, narrative writing and documentary work, and to one day write a successful novel and screenplay.

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