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Adjudication feature in Dominion Voting Systems machines under scrutiny due to high tabulation error rates that funnel more votes to Biden – NaturalNews.com

Brittany Jordan

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Image: Adjudication feature in Dominion Voting Systems machines under scrutiny due to high tabulation error rates that funnel more votes to Biden

(Natural News)
Legitimate concerns have been raised regarding how the voting machines provided by Dominion Voting Systems adjudicate votes that have irregularities. Prior investigations have revealed that one county in Michigan had a suspiciously high tabulation error rate. This indicates that Dominion’s software may be sending far too many ballots for adjudication.

In many states, if a ballot has been incorrectly filled out, instead of tossing the vote away it can be sent to election officials for adjudication under the supervision of poll observers from both parties. The election officials then try their best to determine who a voter intended to vote for. Poll observers can raise objections if they do not agree with the outcome of the adjudication. At least, that is how it is supposed to work.

For counties that use Dominion Voting Systems machines, the voting software has a function that automatically flags ballots for adjudication if it detects any defects, such as overvoting or if the bubbles were improperly filled out. The software also allows for every single ballot in their system to be sent out for adjudication.

In Antrim County, Michigan, a forensic audit of their Dominion machines showed that they supposedly had an error rate of nearly 70 percent, which is unrealistically high and indicates that the system created a scenario wherein large numbers of ballots were opened up to judgment calls. Dominion spokespersons argued that the county does not use digital adjudication. If this is true then the fault lies with the election officials. (Related: Antrim. Co. forensic report reveals Dominion machines were set at 68.05% error rate… meaning 68.05% of ballots could be sent out for mass adjudication.)

A similar scenario has been uncovered in Fulton County, Georgia, which includes parts of Atlanta. Over 113,000 mail-in ballots were scanned in that county, and more than 106,000 of those were sent to adjudication by Nov. 4, according to the county’s director of elections. The county’s spokesperson argued that the director of elections was referring to the number of batches that had at least one ballot sent for adjudication. Whoever is telling the truth, the numbers indicate that a significant number of ballots were flagged down for adjudication.

Listen to this special Situation Update episode of the Health Ranger Report, a podcast by Mike Adams, the Health Ranger, as he talks about how preparations are being made to counterattack against the “Cyber Pearl Harbor” that occurred during the election.

Dominion CEO denies any wrongdoing occurred as a result of their machines

Dominion Voting Systems CEO John Poulos testified via web conference before the Michigan Senate Oversight Committee on Tuesday, Dec. 15, to deny every single allegation brought forth against his company and their voting machines. He called the verifiable allegations conspiracy theories and said that his company was targeted in a relentless campaign of “reckless disinformation.”

“The most important thing to understand about Dominion is this: We do not run elections,” said Poulos, who was attempting to shift the blame to the counties that run the elections on the ground. “Our role is limited to providing local election offices with the machines.”

The hearing with Poulos lasted for around three hours. The majority-Republican Senate Oversight Committee grilled the CEO regarding the intricacies of Dominion’s voting machines, and whether or not he believed it would be possible to commit fraud through them.

“To date, no one has produced credible evidence of vote fraud or vote switching on Dominion systems,” argued Poulos, “because these things have simply not occurred.”

Poulos even tried to argue against the report that came out regarding Dominion’s machines in Antrim County. He said that they do not have access to the county’s systems, and he called the report riddled with political bias.

“A lot of the arguments [in the report] were incomprehensible to me, but then again I haven’t seen any of the files, so I can’t comment on what it is they are looking for,” said Poulos. “But some of the conclusions they had were wrong and false.”

Some Republican officials in the state were convinced by Poulos’ testimony. Lisa Lyons, the Republican county clerk of Kent in western Michigan, said that the CEO’s testimony should put to rest any of the “false” claims of tabulator manipulation.

“Simply put,” said Lyons, “Tabulators don’t run elections. Clerk, staff and election workers from our communities who take an oath to uphold the Constitution run our elections.”

Learn more about the investigations regarding Dominion Voting Systems machines in Michigan and other parts of the country by reading the latest articles at VoteFraud.news.

Sources include:

TheEpochTimes.com

WWMT.com

Fox17Online.com

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Brittany Jordan is an award-winning journalist who reports on breaking news in the U.S. and globally for the Federal Inquirer. Prior to her position at the Federal Inquirer, she was a general assignment features reporter for Newsweek, where she wrote about technology, politics, government news and important global events around the world. Her work has also appeared in the Washington Post, the South Florida Sun-Sentinel, Toronto Star, Frederick News-Post, West Hawaii Today, the Miami Herald, and more. Brittany enjoys food, travel, photography, and hoarding notebooks and journals. Her goal is to do more longform features journalism, narrative writing and documentary work, and to one day write a successful novel and screenplay.

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